March for Science 2017.04.22

This past Saturday, members of SPEAR gathered at the Athens Courthouse to attend the local March for Science rally. After listening to the great program of speakers that ranged from a local high school student to a chaplain, we decided to ask a few more people for their science stories and why they felt compelled to participate in the march.
We spoke with an ER Doctor who is also an Engineer. He told us that he has not been particularly politically active in the past but felt that it was necessary to participate due to the recent political climate. His main concerns were women’s rights issues and the funding controversy over basic science. In his words,  “women’s healthcare rights aren’t an option”.
His “Now I am a Mad Scientist” sign is featured in the picture below.

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We then spoke with a couple–one is an academic advisor and a poet, while the other is a history professor.
They have been politically active in the past and feel strongly about participating in protests and other political events. They were most concerned about the denial of climate change and the rollback of regulations on the EPA.
“We feel a sense of history, and don’t want to have the mistakes of the past repeated,” they told us.
They held some unique signs, featured below:
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The March for Science was a crucial first step in bringing awareness to the importance of science and the need for policies that support scientific research.  But it doesn’t stop there. SPEAR plans to continue to educate the public about and advocate for scientific policies and research. Check our website every Monday for a Call to Action to urge your local and federal congress people to support science. Write a letter explaining why you marched at our interest meeting on April 24th. We hope you will join us in our efforts to #standupforscience.

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